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Presenting Results

TABLES
Some data are best presented in a table format. Here are tips on how to correctly present a table. Remember to include a description that goes ABOVE the table.

Tips on presenting results in a table.

GRAPHS
Graphs come in many types: Line graphs, Bar graphs, Scatter plots, Pie charts, etc. The best fit for the data will depend on the experiment. Remember to include a description that goes BELOW the graph.

Tips for presenting results in a graph


2 Responses to Presenting Results

  1. Thomas

    Hey, Im not sure if i have variables or not. My project is about surface tension. I put objects on water and canola oil to see if surface tension holds them up or not. Please help me i only have a few days (2 days)

  2. Dr. Maille Lyons

    Thomas – you do have variables!

    Your INDEPENDENT variable is the “thing” you varied or changed. It sounds to me like the objects were different ? so if you put different objects on oil and water then this was one of your independent variables. The other INDEPENDENT variable would be the liquids. Water (sounds like your control) and oil (your experimental situation)

    Your DEPENDENT variable is the “thing” you measured. It sounds like you either counted yes/no for if the liquid held up the object or maybe you timed how long it took before the object fell through? Either way, your DEPENDENT variable is the yes/no condition or the time.

    Cheers,
    Dr. Lyons

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